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  1. #76
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    My mileage rolled over the 130,000 mark on the way home from work this past Friday, so the 135i was due for another day in the garage come Saturday. I've been using OCIs of 3,000-4,000 miles, and as much as I drive, that comes along often. I should buy stock in Motul. In addition to the routine oil change, I'd also noticed some slight coming from the front wheel bearings when turning. They certainly looked rough, so I figured I'd preventively go ahead and change those out before the problem got any worse.

    For a little under $300 from FCPEuro, I was able to get two front hub assemblies, 8 new bolts (these are supposedly non-reusable and the new ones come pre loaded with thread locking compound, and 2 new brake disc set screws.

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    As always, grabbed my trusty BMS 17mm wheel socket so I don't scratch up the ARC-8s. I've also been pleasantly surprised at how well my powder coated calipers have held up as the mileage adds up. They still look like the day I received them back from finishing.

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    After removing the front wheels, I took the time to get out my tire tread measurement tool to see how the Firestones were holding up. 6/32nds on the fronts, and 5/32nds on the rear. I've put about 25,000 miles on this set, so they're holding up pretty well. It doesn't look like they'll last as long as the Hankook V12 Evo2s I had previously, but the Firestone do grip better in dry/wet, and look better too.

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    Prior to starting the wheel bearing DIY, I found this extremely helpful video showing the exact steps. The process to the E82 is just like the E90 and bolt sizes are the same as well.



    Removal of the old wheel bearings started with removing the brake caliper, rotor, and then starting the process of removing the 4 bolts on the backside of the hub assembly. It might not be completely necessary, by I removed the wheel speed sensor to gain some more room as well. This was not the easiest area to photograph.

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    These bolts are very very hard to remove. They have thread locking material from the factory, and take a lot of effort to remove. There wasn't really enough room to get power tools in there unfortunately, so I just had to use patience and a few different 18mm bolt removal tools. The old ones had seem better days aesthetically, and looked like they need a refreshment.

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    The Apex wheel stud kit was also fused with the old hub assemblies, so I switched back to normal wheel bolts. They had tarnished into a rusted look anyways, so I was glad to see them go. It's easier to mount wheels with studs, but the rusty look of the studs wasn't for me.

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    This is prior to installing the new hub assembly:

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    And afterwards:

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    Before starting up the car, I added 7 quarts of Motul.

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    I also fastened down the Craftsman socket set I received in the boot. I felt vulnerable traveling with no tools in this car, and received this as a Christmas gift. The well organized plastic case made it a perfect candidate for staying in the car in case of emergencies.

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    Now she's ready to return to daily duties!

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    In fact, the very next day my wife, Winston, and I set off for a little Sunday drive into the Pisgah National Forest for a long hike, followed by a stop by Sierra Nevada brewery for a few beers, before heading home for the evening. Here’s a few other shots I took, as well as a little montage I made of the day’s activities. I’ve been looking for excuses to use the S&Q function on the Sony A7iii.

    Constantly making great memories in the 1er.

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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  2. #77
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    Even though it's only been 40 days since my last update, this E82 road warrior has racked up nearly 4,500 miles in that time, bringing the odometer up to 133,000 and counting. In North Carolina, that has meant some pretty cold weather recently. That used to mean rough starts on higher concentrations of E85, but after BMS revised their cold start tables on their back end flashes, things are now OEM smooth.





    Eventually the 30's gave way to even colder temperatures, and on one particularly frigid morning in the mountains, a single digit cold start was the last bit of energy my battery had left to give. Seeing as how this was still the original, I knew it was only a matter of time before I would have to find a replacement. Daily driving this car plus the intelligent battery sensor really seemed to have stretched the life of the OEM battery which lasted over 10 years.


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    Before swapping out the dead battery, I performed another routine oil change with Motul and a Mann.


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    Without too much trouble, I managed to get the old OEM battery out and sat it beside the Interstate replacement to compare. I was relieved to find out they were identical sizes.


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    I wasn't interested in coding the battery -- only registering, so I went with something with a similar aH rating and non-AGM. The Interstate Mega-Tron Plus MTP-49/H8-1 is 100aH versus 90aH of the OEM, and packs more cold cranking amps and reserve minutes.


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    15 minutes later and I had everything secured, terminals tightened down, and was ready to register the battery -- which was as simple as opening up the MHD app, going to reset adaptations, and registering the battery.


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    Before finishing up, I also swapped out the third brake light and added a matte black 135i emblem. This is my 4th brake light, and although the vinyl tint made the third one last longer than the previous two, it still managed to crack on the tops and bottom enough to bother me.


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    I ordered this purposely through FCP Euro, so I'll be interested to see if they warranty the part the next time it breaks, which it almost certainly will.


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    I have a very busy next month or so, but getting some dyno time will be a priority in March.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  3. #78
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    His oil analysis:

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  4. #79
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    I wanted to add another update to this build thread as the 1er recently passed 140,000 miles and is still going strong, but recently got some time off + some new parts.


    I was presented with the opportunity to purchase a E90 335i with a manual transmission that needed a few repairs and the owner wasn’t in a position to invest the money to get it road ready again. I wasn’t able to start the car up to confirm all this, but according to the previous owner the car had a bad water pump and/or thermostat, a leaky valve cover, leaky oil filter housing gaskets, needed tires, as well as a deep cleaning. I was a little hesitant about purchasing a car without hearing and driving it first, but all the maintenance records were included and I felt confident the drivetrain was in good shape. Because of the ailments the car was suffering from, I wasn’t able to drive the car from where it was (about an hour away) to my location, so I had to enlist the help of a flatbed to get it back to my garage before digging in.


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    Before too long, I had my first E90 up on jack stands, splash shields off, wheels dismounted and started my deep dive to put together a list of parts I’d need to buy,


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    I headed straight to FCP Euro to utilize their lifetime warranty and made a rather large order for: new thermostat, new water pump, new bolts, two gallons of coolant, a new cylinder head to thermostat hose (these are known to break down by this mileage, new oil cooler and oil filter housing gaskets (including o-rings), new coils, new spark plugs, a new power steering reservoir o-ring, and a few other miscellaneous items. Once those arrived, I was really ready to start the dirty work (literally).


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    I replaced the water pump on my 135i a little over two years ago back when the car only had 74,000 miles, so now at over 140,000 miles, it was approaching the same amount of miles my first water pump endured before I replaced it as preventive maintenance before it left me stranded. So even though it was still working perfectly, I decided to remove both assemblies from the 335i and the 135i, which takes patience on top of the inevitable coolant bath you’ll be taking. Eventually though, I had all the coolant removed and the water pumps out of both cars. Here’s the new, used, and inoperable water pumps and thermostats laid out prior to re-installation:


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    I took the new water pump and thermostat from FCP Euro with the lifetime warranty and installed it on my 135i. This would give me a brand new assembly on the 1er, as well as the peace of mind of knowing I had a free replacement waiting if this one ever went bad. The used, but perfectly functioning water pump and thermostat, were installed on the 335i to replace the inoperable parts that were leaking coolant everywhere. At this point I had gotten pretty speedy with the procedure just because I’d done it a couple times.


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    Once all the water pumps were swapped, it was time to move on to plugs. I wasn’t sure the last time the coils and plugs had been replaced on the 335i, but I knew my 135i was due for NGK spark plugs since I’d been running them for about 15,000 miles, so paying some attention to the ignition system was up next for both cars. The plugs on the 335i weren’t in the best shape, but weren't terrible either.


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    They were replaced with a brand new set of OEM plugs, and I swapped the lightly used ignition coils from my 135i to the 335i. I then pulled the NGK plugs on the 135i. For 15,000 miles, they looked pristine.


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    I then used the BMS gap tool to set the .022 I’d been using on the NGK plugs, and installed brand new Bosch coils from FCP Euro on the 135i, which also meant I had a lifetime warranty now on coils for the 1er.


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    The 335i needed a valve cover gasket next, so I started the teardown for that process. Before long I had the old valve cover off and was ready to inspect for cracks.


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    Luckily there were no cracks, so I proceeded to fit in the new gasket to the valve cover.


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    After reassembly and torquing everything back to stock, it was time to replace the oil cooler and filter housing gaskets. Following removal, it was easy to see why there were leaking all down the front of the engine.


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    Once that was completed, I replaced all the wastegate lines with high temp silicone ones, I drained the original manual transmission fluid and replaced with fresh Redline ATF, I replaced the battery, registered it with MHD, changed the oil and filter, filled up the coolant and followed the electronic bleed procedure. Because the car had been sitting for a while, I made sure to disconnect the injector wires, and prime the system for 10 seconds on 3 different occasions before firing it up and letting everything get up to temperature. To my satisfaction, everything seemed and sounded perfect.


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    I then spent quite a while refinishing the headlights and giving the exterior paint some attention. Before too long the inside and outside were looking excellent.


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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  5. #80
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    After weighing out the affordable tire options for the 19 inch Breyton GTS Race wheels already installed, I decided to go with a set of Achilles Sport 2 245/275 combo tires and glad I did. They filled everything out perfectly and didn’t rub at all on the stock m-sport suspension. Lastly, I added some front splitters and yellow vinyl over the fogs to complete the look I was going for. Here’s a few shots of the car prior to putting it up for sale. At this point, I had considered keeping it, but really have my heart set on a E90 M3 in a year or so.


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    Not only had I fixed all the problems with the 335i and gotten it running reliably, but I’d also managed to get lifetime warrantied water pump and coils on my current 135i that I’d be keeping long term. Before completely buttoning up the 1er, I had one last new part to put on--a VRSF 335d coolant tank charge pipe that is better fitting for single turbo and inlet cars. Even though I didn’t have the 335d coolant tank, and had just relocated my 135i tank to the driver’s side when I went ST, the ER charge pipe fit had always fit poorly for my setup, so I took the opportunity to swap it out for a better fitting unit that also shows off the Tial blow off valve instead of hiding it out of sight.


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    The tires on my 135i are reaching the end of their usable lifespan, and I plan on replacing them with the same Achilles Sport 2 tires that I put on the 335i. They’re about half the price of the current Firestone Indy 500 and Hankook V12 Evo2 options I’ve previously had installed on this car and I’ve decided to to try them out. As soon as those are mounted up, I’m determined to carve out some dyno time.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  6. #81
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    I did a ton of maintenance on my wife’s Acura recently. I put in a new AC system and took the front bumper off. When I did, I figured I would fix her yellowing headlights. I used 1000 grit, sprayed on some new 2k-clear and they look fantastic. I can’t believe I didn’t do it sooner. I was polishing them too often and they would start hazing again.
    I want to do those gaskets to my car as well but I don’t feel like draining fluids again and getting messy. I’m sure it’s “easy” but just time consuming. Good job getting it up and running.
    I also just purchased the firehawk Indy 500 for the Acura . They seem good so far. Not sure if i would try the Achilles. Do a follow up on the tires later and post if they meet at least some aggressive driving limits.

  7. #82
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    Over the past month or so, I’d spent a lot of time with the E90 I’d been prepping for sale. After selling the car this past Friday and sending it down the road with its new owner, I decided to dedicate some time on Sunday towards the E82 since the weather was so choice. While the car gets washed regularly, it needed a good clay barring--as well as a fresh coat of wax. The pitted headlight lenses also had been begging for some attention, so they would get refinished as well.


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    To avoid scratching the paint, I took the time to tape everything off prior to getting to work with the 3M Headlight Lens Restoration kit I’d picked up.


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    After multiple passes with the coarser pads, I started achieving the “slurry” build up on the lens covers that the instructions called for.


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    Many hours later, the paint surface was perfectly smooth and the headlights looked far better than before. Not perfect, but a major improvement.


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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  8. #83
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    It took over 40,000 miles of use, but my switch to a single turbo finally caused some issues. As the temperatures started to warm up a few months ago, I noticed my air conditioning was not working properly. The blower fan was working, and the compressor was activating, but only ambient temperature was flowing. The car was now 11 years old and had almost 150K on the clock, so I was hoping it just needed a recharge--although I knew it shouldn't have leaked out in the first place. I removed all the cowling to take a closer look, and quickly discovered my issue.

    There is a high pressure A/C line that runs from the passenger side front of the car, underneath the single turbo, along the passenger side strut tower, all the way across the firewall, and ends near the driver's side strut tower where the high pressure Schrader valve is located. In two separate areas, rubbing had caused pinholes in the aluminum line, allowing all my freon to escape.

    Neither of these problematic areas were caused by the ACF single turbo kit itself, but rather the DOCRace heat shield I added, and my placement of the fuel feed to the port injection manifold. It turns out I'd underestimated how much the engine moves on the mounts, and over time, the lines got punctured from rubbing. Both could have, and should have been avoided, especially after looking over my past pictures. The heat shield was the most obvious place rubbing was going to be an issue. The hard edge of the shield dented in, and eventually pushed through the line causing a hole.

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    I didn't notice it at the time of installation, but the port injection rail comes with two different inputs--one to run the y-line and one that's to be capped off. I used the wrong one, on the end of the rail, which made clearance between the fitting and the A/C line almost non existent. I've since switched the feed to the area in between the runners, which allows the A/C line to sit without any threat of being contacted by anything.

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    Once I had figured out where the problem was, next came the task of tracking down the part. I had thought of trying to have the line repaired, or using JB Weld to hope for a miracle, but there was little to no chance of my repair holding up to the high pressure. That meant I'd probably need to track down a new OEM line. Eventually I tracked down the part I needed from Tischer (getBMWparts.com), but it came from Germany so it took almost 3 weeks to get here.

    Getting the old line off and new line in without removing any major components was going to be the real challenge of this repair. I ended up cutting the old, damaged line at a convenient location to get it out easier. Old line on the left, new OEM line on the right.

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    I took extra precaution and used some DEI sleeve for added protection.

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    It took probably an hour for me to carefully snake the new line underneath the compressor housing, past the wastegate, and into the area where it bolts into the condenser. This time around, I made sure to secure this line away from any possible things it could come in contact with.

    While the A/C line was being shipped, I tried to educate myself on exactly how an automotive A/C system works and how to properly recharge it. That meant I'd need a vacuum pump, a set of manifold gauges, and some R-134a refrigerant. I picked up the vacuum pump and manifold gauges on Amazon, and the refrigerant at a local auto parts store. After setting all the new equipment up, I attached the high and pressure gauges to the lines, which are located near the driver's side strut tower. It's impossible to mix them up because they are different sizes and only attach to the correct line.

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    Because the lines had been open for so long, and really any time you want to properly recharge an A/C system, you'll want to pull a vacuum for an extended period of time. In this case, I pulled a vacuum for 45 minutes just to make sure all the moisture and refrigerant had been expelled from the system.

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    After 45 minutes, I closed off the lines, disconnected the vacuum pump, and waited another 30 minutes to make sure that the gauges remained at 30 inHg vacuum and there were no leaks. Following that waiting period, and after verifying the system was still under vacuum, it was time to put in the new refrigerant. The 135i takes 1.3 pounds of refrigerant, give or take .02 pounds. After converting this to around 20 ounces, I used my digital scale to find out the actual weight of the freon inside so I could be as precise as possible. I definitely didn't want to overfill the system.

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    The only thing left to do was start the car, crank up the A/C, attach the R-134a can, pierce the top, and let the car suck in the proper amount of refrigerant. 15 minutes later my car once again had ice cold A/C, which was a blessing given the mid 90 degree temperatures I'd been seeing in the Carolinas. Once that was charged, I installed a new shorty single turbo filter from BMS for some fresh air--the original had gotten filthy over the last forty thousand miles.

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    My tires are on their last leg, so I will be getting some new rubber mounted soon. Once those are installed, I really want to follow up on my promise of getting back to a DynoJet with the single setup. I also picked up this fancy boost leak tester for my top mount that I'll be putting to use beforehand. I don't think I have any leaks, but I still want to make sure prior to putting down new power numbers.

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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  9. #84
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    Same happened to me. One year of driving hard and the AC line held. One small trip from work to Aldi’s to grab some quick items and as soon as I turn the car off and set the parking brake, BAM, Hissssssssss. I had Carlisle make a new hose from my old one. I only wanted a section of flex but after passing it person to person they made the whole thing a flexible hose. I remember how hard it was to get that darn line out.

    Seeing your pictures reminds me of the same things I purchased . Harbor freight manifold and 2 stage vacuum. It worked and I got my AC back as well. It was months I went without it but after I moved to Texas , I couldn’t drive with the windows down anymore. Way too hot here.

    So glad you got it done. Good to see someone else get through the same problem.

  10. #85
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ///MPOSTER Click here to enlarge
    Same happened to me. One year of driving hard and the AC line held. One small trip from work to Aldi’s to grab some quick items and as soon as I turn the car off and set the parking brake, BAM, Hissssssssss. I had Carlisle make a new hose from my old one. I only wanted a section of flex but after passing it person to person they made the whole thing a flexible hose. I remember how hard it was to get that darn line out.

    Seeing your pictures reminds me of the same things I purchased . Harbor freight manifold and 2 stage vacuum. It worked and I got my AC back as well. It was months I went without it but after I moved to Texas , I couldn’t drive with the windows down anymore. Way too hot here.

    So glad you got it done. Good to see someone else get through the same problem.
    Nice to hear I'm not the only one. I have a build thread on a few other forums and people have spoken up there as well saying they've had trouble with the same line on their ST setup. If I have any more issues, I may look into getting a custom line that doesn't navigate through the hot side components so much--BUT hopefully I won't have any more problems with how I have it secured.

    The manifold gauges and vacuum pump I picked up off Amazon for a little over a hundred bucks and it's already paid for itself with one job.

    And I feel you on the windows down riding trying to get by with no A/C. I did it for months. It helped for a short time during the Spring months here in NC and SC, but now that we're officially in the summer, the ambient air was so hot and humid it didn't matter. Ended up being a very satisfying repair when I felt that icy air coming out of the vents again.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    Since my last update where I resolved my AC line issues, everything has held up well so far and continues to blow ice cold air--an absolute necessity for the temperatures and humidity we’ve been having in the Carolinas. I’ve continued to daily drive the car long distances, putting it through its paces as it crossed 147,000 miles a few days back. Almost every afternoon recently, we’ve had thunderstorms, so the exterior of the 1er has been dirty for weeks. And after taking my wife and dog on a hike this past weekend, the interior was filthy and in need of some attention as well. No real news to update, but I did give the car a thorough detail, performed an oil change, installed the Achilles ATR Sport 2 tires, and installed a new set of BMS cowl filters. Everything seems to be holding together great as I approach 150K here soon--she certainly doesn’t look to have that much mileage underneath her.


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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    I've really been enjoying the sounds of everything with the BMS cowl covers installed and the large OEM assembly removed, as well as the extra cooling. The metal intake manifold used to be too hot to touch during normal operation, but now I can comfortably rest my hand right on the top.

    I have been a bit worried about summer thunderstorms and the lack of protection from water getting through the filters and into the blower motor and interior of the car. So I tried to test out a set of Hydra Performance cowl covers on top. These should allow me to run the BMS filters and eliminate the threat of water entering the cabin.

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    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    I like those cowl covers, do you have a link where you purchased them?

    Thanks

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Ronnied24 Click here to enlarge
    I like those cowl covers, do you have a link where you purchased them?

    Thanks
    No link. You'll have to get in touch with Hydra Performance through Facebook or email to get a set. They were $99 with shipping included from Asia to the US.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    Thanks

  16. #91
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chadillac2000 Click here to enlarge
    Everything seems to be holding together great as I approach 150K
    Sure looks clean for that mileage.
    Three sets of brand new 991.2 3.0 headers for sale: Kline, Fabspeed, and Vektor Ceramic Coated

    IPD plenum for Porsche 991.2 3.0 for sale: $650

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    My 1er hit a big milestone this week as the odometer passed 150,000 miles with no signs of slowing down anytime soon. It was also time to switch spark plugs after running the NGK 5992 for around 15,000 miles. Since those were on national backorder, I decided to try the NGK 97506 2-step colder plugs that I probably should have been running anyways. The old plugs that came out still looked great and hadnít given me any misfires while they were installed.

    Click here to enlarge

    I gapped the new plugs to 0.020 using the BMS gap tool and installed then with ease using the BMS spark plug socket. Once the coils were back in and everything was buttoned up, I fired the car up to ensure smooth idle. Sure enough, buttery smooth at the 950RPM idle mark I have set through MHD.

    Also got back my latest Blackstone analysis and it looks like the N54 power plant is still looking great:

    Click here to enlarge
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

  18. #93
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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chadillac2000 Click here to enlarge
    Also got back my latest Blackstone analysis and it looks like the N54 power plant is still looking great:
    Great analysis.

    Anything new?

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    2 out of 2 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chadillac2000 Click here to enlarge
    Wishing you luck with your sale.
    Three sets of brand new 991.2 3.0 headers for sale: Kline, Fabspeed, and Vektor Ceramic Coated

    IPD plenum for Porsche 991.2 3.0 for sale: $650

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    Christmas 2019 was a good one. After entertaining a few offers on this car over the past month, and feeling very uneasy about letting it go, Iíve found a way to keep the 135i and upgrade to a newer, performance sedan sometime in 2020 without getting rid of something Iíve invested so much time and effort into. I knew Iíd regret it big time eventually.

    The 1er also got a present -- a set of brand new Berk midpipes. For the past 100,000 miles Iíve been running a hacked up N54 midpipe with Vibrant 1790 resonators installed in place of the secondary cats and itís been great, but Iíve always eyeballed this purpose-built two-piece midpipe setup from Berk for some time now. Build quality looks top notch and came with new hardware and gaskets. It should sound great in between the ACF 3Ē downpipe and the MadDad Whisper. Should be installing these sometime in January.

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    So what larger vehicle are you looking at? I just looked at a 2016 550i and 340i and was shocked the 340i had more rear passenger room.

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    1 out of 1 members liked this post. Yes Reputation No
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Weehe Click here to enlarge
    So what larger vehicle are you looking at? I just looked at a 2016 550i and 340i and was shocked the 340i had more rear passenger room.
    At the moment, I'm probably most interested in an F10 M5.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by chadillac2000 Click here to enlarge
    At the moment, I'm probably most interested in an F10 M5.
    Do it! Very practical, fast, comfortable, and it does everything. Good family car IMO, I love mine Click here to enlarge
    Burger Motorsports
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    I had the chance to spend some time with the 1er over this past weekend in order to install the new Berk midpipes Iíd gotten recently, as well as take care of a few other maintenance items. Iíd been getting some intermittent o2 sensor codes, which is common with single turbo setups, and since the downpipe has to be removed to access them, this would be a good timae to swap those out with a new set of NTKs. The last set lasted almost 60,000 miles before they started triggering codes occasionally, so I stayed with the same brand. I also had some Redline D4 ATF and 75W90 gear oils on hand to flush out the fluids in the manual transmission and rear differential while the midpipe was out -- they were both due. Hereís a comparison pictures of my old midpipe and its shinier replacement.

    Click here to enlarge

    After replacing the o2 sensors, which is a most unpleasant job given the extremely small amount of space to work with, I noticed how worn all of my top mount heat protection gear had become. Iíd only had the turbo blanket on and off a handful of times over the nearly 60,000 miles Iíd had this top mount setup, but the extreme heat had gotten the best of it. The v-band clamp attaching the downpipe to the hot side of the turbo was also destroyed during removal. The heat wrap on my downpipe was tattered and had come off in spots.

    Click here to enlarge

    The next time I have my car torn down completely, Iíll probably take the time to have the hot parts ceramic coated and get rid of the exhaust wrap all together. Hereís a shot of the engine bay after the o2 sensors were replaced, the downpipe was reattached with a new 3 inch v-band clamp and a new Amazon turbo blanket. From what Iíve read, all the turbo blankets break down eventually, so might as well consider this something Iíll have to replace every few years. I prefer the darker color of this one, but it didnít fit quite as snug as the one included with the ACF kit.

    Click here to enlarge

    Click here to enlarge

    Installation of the Berk midpipes was pretty straightforward, but even with swivel sockets and extensions, getting all of the nuts and bolts tightens took patience. Berk included new hardware and gaskets, along with another exhaust hanger. Initially I did not install the exhaust hanger because I wasnít sure what it was for, and experienced some rubbing. After some more research I discovered that the shorter exhaust hanger is actually for the axleback portion of the exhaust and it pulls the entire midpipe enough to avoid any vibrations from hitting the v-brace below it. Once that was corrected, everything fit nicely and wasnít rubbing on anything. These pipes look great underneath the car mated up to the ACF downpipe and MadDad Whisper axleback.

    Click here to enlarge

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    First impressions are that volume is increased probably 20%, but still not too loud. Just perfect. The modified OEM midpipe I had been running had mellowed out some of the aggressiveness of this engine/turbo setup, but the elimination of the stock resonator and larger diameter piping from the Berk really gives the car a sinister snarl. Sound clips to come.
    ACF PTE 6062 BB Top Mount ST Kit, Fuel-It! Stage 3 LPFP, Phoenix Racing Port Injection Manifold + RACE FMIC, JB4 + BMS ST E85 PI BEF

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